Infinite Worlds

Infinite Worlds

Excerpt from "Infinite Worlds" p. 6

Thirty years ago, former Dartmouth physicist Paul Van Zandt changed the world. Actually, he changed hundreds of them. He invented a parachronic projector, a machine that could send Matter into another dimension – another timeline. The first world he discovered was  EarthBeta,” almost identical to his own world, which he dubbed “Homeline.”
But as he improved his technology and his survey techniques, he began to discover worlds where Rome never fell, or where America was a feudal kingdom. Some worlds – those on the
same “quantum level” as Homeline, Quantum 5 (Q5) – were easy to reach. Others, on Q4 and Q6, were slightly harder; Quantum 3 and Quantum 7 were downright difficult. However, Van Zandt persevered, and built up a small team of daring assistants who helped him map 23 more universes. He funded further research with profits from trading between worlds, an undertaking he formalized with White Star Trading. In 1998, Van Zandt revealed his discovery of parachronic travel to the public, and revealed a secret to the U.N. Security Council. Whatever the secret was, it halted demands for his technology to be nationalized, militarized, or destroyed. Instead, the Security Council established the United Nations Interworld Council (UNIC) from its own membership, which chartered a new corporation, Infinity Unlimited (often shortened to “Infinity” by the media). Van Zandt became CEO of Infinity, and UNIC added its own bureaucrats to the board. The Interworld Treaty, which chartered Infinity, required that Infinity work to “better the lot” of the other worlds it explored and exploited. To that end – and possibly to counter the threat Van Zandt revealed to the Security Council – Van Zandt created the Infinity Patrol.
 

Infinite Worlds

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